Cisco Pre Shared Key Generator

The pre-shared key is merely used for authentication, not for encryption! IPsec tunnels rely on the ISAKMP/IKE protocols to exchange the keys for encryption, etc. But before IKE can work, both peers need to authenticate each other (mutual authentication). This is the only part in which the PSKs are used (RFC 2409). RandomKeygen is a free mobile-friendly tool that offers randomly generated keys and passwords you can use to secure any application, service or device. KEY RandomKeygen - The Secure Password & Keygen Generator. There are a couple ways to retrieve a pre-shared key for a Cisco IPSEC VPN. The easiest way is to actually get it from the running config on the ASA. Unfortunately using a show run will only give you asterisks for the PSK, but you can use this command to see the PSK in the config: more system:/running-config. With our WLAN Key generator, simply insert your desired pass phrase and it will generate the necessary HEX value encryption key that needs to be used in the CLI or Web-Based configuration of the Cisco Access Point. The Wireless LAN Key Generator allows for quick and valid WEP/WPA key generation. You can use the Random WEP/WPA Key Generator to.

IPSec VPN Setup with IKE Preshared Key and Manual Key on WRVS4400N Router

Objective

Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) is used to protect communications through the encryption of IP packets during a communication session. IPSec is also an internet protocol used to establish mutual authentication between two endpoints at the beginning of a communication session and negotiation of cryptographic keys during session. Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a private network that allows the transmission of information between two PCs across the network. VPN establishes a high level of security on the private network through the use of encryption.

This document shows the configuration of the IPSec VPN with IKE Preshared Key and Manual Key on a WRVS4400N router.

Applicable Devices

• WRVS4400N

Software Version

• v2.0.2.1

Configuration of IPSec VPN Setup

Step 1. Log into the web configuration utility page and choose VPN > IPSec VPN. The IPSec VPN page opens:

Step 2. Choose an option from the Keying Mode drop-down list.

• IKE with Preshared Key — If you select IKE with Preshared key the automatic key management protocols are used to negotiate key material for SA (Security Association).

• Manual — If you select Manual Key Management no key negotiation is needed. The Manual key is usually used for small environments or for troubleshooting purposes.

Note: Both sides of the VPN Tunnel must use the same key management method.

IPSec VPN Setup with IKE Preshared Key

Step 1. Choose IKE with Preshared Key from the drop-down list of the Keying Mode field.

In the Phase 1 area,

Step 2. Choose 3DES in the Encryption field. The Encryption method determines the length of the key used to encrypt/decrypt ESP packets. Only 3DES is supported.

Note: Both sides of the VPN Tunnel must use the same Encryption method.

Step 3. Choose an option from the Authentication drop-down list. Authentication determines a method to authenticate ESP Packets. The user can choose MD5 or SHA1 from the drop-down list.

• MD5 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 128-bit digest. This is not as secure as SHA1 because it is a broken one-way has algorithm.

• SHA1 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 160-bit digest. This is a more secure has algorithm but is not as fast as MD5.

Note: Both sides of the VPN endpoints must use the same Authentication method.

Step 4. Choose an option from the Group drop-down list. The Diffie-Hellman (DH) group is used for key exchange.

•768-bit (Group 1) algorithm — This group provides the least level of security and specifies the IPSec to use 768-bit for DH key exchange

•1024-bit (Group 2) algorithm — This group specifies the IPSec to use for 1024-bit for DH key exchange.

•1536-bit (Group 5) algorithm — This group provides the highest level of security to the network and specifies the IPSec to use 1536-bit for DH key exchange.

Note: Group 5 provides the most security whereas the Group 1 the least security.

Step 5. Enter the lifetime (in seconds) of the IKE generated key in the Key LifeTime. When the time expires, a new key will be renegotiated automatically. The Key Lifetime ranges from 1081 to 86400 seconds. The default value for Phase 1 is 28800 seconds.

In the Phase 2 area,

Step 6. Choose 3EDS in the Encryption field. The Encryption method determines the length of the key used to encrypt/decrypt ESP packets, Only 3DES is supported

Note: Both sides of the VPN Tunnel must use the same Encryption method.

Step 7. Choose an option from the Authentication drop-down list. Authentication determines a method to authenticate ESP Packets. The user can choose MD5 or SHA1 from the drop-down list.

• MD5 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 128-bit digest. This is not as secure as SHA1 because it is a broken one-way hash algorithm.

• SHA1 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 160-bit digest. This is a more secure has algorithm but is not as fast as MD5.

Note: Both sides of the VPN endpoints must use the same Authentication method.

Step 8. Choose an option from the Prefect Forward Secrecy (PFS) drop-down list.

• Enabled — If PFS is enabled, IKE Phase 2 negotiation will generate a new key material for IP traffic encryption and authentication.

• Disabled —If PFS is disabled, IKE Phase 2 negotiation will not generate a new key material for IP traffic encryption and authentication.

Note: Both sides must have selected the same PFS.

Step 9. Enter the character and hexadecimal value that specifies a key used to authenticate IP traffic in the Preshared Key field.

Step 10. Choose an option from the Group drop-down list.The Diffie-Hellman (DH) group to be used for key exchange.

•768-bit (Group 1) algorithm — This group provides the least level of security and specifies the IPSec to use 768-bit for DH key exchange

•1024-bit (Group 2) algorithm — This group specifies the IPSec to use for 1024-bit for DH key exchange.

•1536-bit (Group 5) algorithm — This group provides the highest level of security to the network and specifies the IPSec to use 1536-bit for DH key exchange.

Note: Group 5 provides the most security whereas the Group 1 the least security.

Step 11. Enter the lifetime (in seconds) of the IKE generated key in the Key LifeTime. If time expires,a new key will be renegotiated automatically. The Key Lifetime ranges from 1081 to 86400 seconds. The default value for Phase 2 is 3600 seconds.

Step 12. Click the Save to save set up.

IPSec VPN Setup with Manual Key

In the IPSec Setup area,

Step 1. Choose the Manual key from the drop-down list of the Keying Mode field.

In the Phase 1 area,

Step 2. Choose 3DES in the Encryption field. The Encryption method determines the length of the key used to encrypt/decrypt ESP packets,Only 3DES is supported.

Note: Both sides of the VPN Tunnel must use the same Encryption method.

Step 3. Choose an option from the Authentication drop-down list. Authentication determines a method to authenticate ESP Packets. The user can choose MD5 or SHA1 from the drop-down list.

•MD5 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 128-bit digest.

•SHA1 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 160-bit digest.

Note: Both sides of the VPN endpoints must use the same Authentication method.

Step 4. Choose an option from the Group drop-down list. The Diffie-Hellman (DH) group is used for key exchange.

•768-bit (Group 1) algorithm — This group provides the least level of security and specifies the IPSec to use 768-bit for DH key exchange

•1024-bit (Group 2) algorithm — This group specifies the IPSec to use for 1024-bit for DH key exchange.

•1536-bit (Group 5) algorithm — This group provides the highest level of security to the network and specifies the IPSec to use 1536-bit for DH key exchange.

Note: Group 5 provides the most security whereas the Group 1 the least security.

Step 5. Enter the lifetime (in seconds) of the IKE generated key in the Key LifeTime. If time expires, a new key will be renegotiated automatically. The Key Lifetime range from 1081 to 86400 seconds. The default value for Phase 1 is 28800 seconds.

In the Phase 2 area,

Step 6. Choose 3EDS in the Encryption Algorithm field. The Encryption method determines the length of the key used to encrypt/decrypt ESP packets, Only 3DES is supported

Note: Both sides of the VPN Tunnel must use the same Encryption method.

Step 7. Enter the encryption key in the Encryption Key field. Since Encryption Algorithm is 3DES enter 24 ASCII Characters as key in the Encryption Key field.

Step 8. Choose an option from the Authentication Algorithm drop-down list. Authentication determines a method to authenticate ESP Packets. The user can choose MD5 or SHA1 from the drop-down list.

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• MD5 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 128-bit digest.

•SHA1 — A one-way hashing algorithm that produces a 160-bit digest.

Step 9. Enter the authentication key in the Authentication Key field. If MD5 algorithm was chosen in authentication algorithm field enter 16 ASCII characters as key, otherwise if SHA1 algorithm was chosen enter 20 ASCII characters as authentication key.

Step 10. Enter the inbound SPI (Security Parameter Index) in the Inbound SPI field.

Step 11. Enter the outbound SPI (Security Parameter Index) in the Inbound SPI field.

The SPI (Security Parameter Index) is carried in the ESP(Encapsulating Security Payload) header. This enables the receiver to select the SA, under which a packet should be processed. The SPI is a 32-bit value. Both decimal and hexadecimal values are acceptable. Each tunnel must have unique an Inbound SPI and Outbound SPI. No two tunnels share the same SPI.

Step 12. Enter the outbound SPI (Security Parameter Index) in the Inbound SPI field.

Note: The Inbound SPI should match with the router Outbound SPI, and vice verse.

Step 13. Click the Save to save set up.

IPSec VPN Status

Step 1. Log in to the web configuration utility, choose VPN > IPSec VPN. The IPSec VPN page opens:

Note: Please make sure a VPN Tunnel is created. Refer to article IPSec VPN Local and Remote Group Setup on WRVS4400N Router on how to do this.

Step 2. Click Advanced. It displays two more options.

• Aggressive mode — Aggressive Mode squeezes the IKE SA negotiation into three packets, with all data required for the SA passed by the initiator. The responder sends the proposal, key material and ID, and authenticates the session in the next packet. The initiator replies by authenticating the session. Negotiation is quicker, and the initiator and responder ID pass in the clear.

• NetBios Broadcast — NetBIOS broadcasts a Name Query packet to the local network on UDP port 137. Every computer on the local subnet processes the broadcast packet. If a computer on the network is configured for the NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) protocol, the NetBIOS module in the computer receives the broadcast.

Step 3. Click the desired button.

• Connect — Establishes the connection for the current VPN tunnel.

• Disconnect — Breaks the connection for the current VPN tunnel.

• View Log — It displays VPN logs and the details of each tunnel established.

Step 4. Click Save, to save all the changes.

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Azure S2S VPN connections provide secure, cross-premises connectivity between customer premises and Azure. This tutorial walks through IPsec S2S VPN connection life cycles such as creating and managing a S2S VPN connection. You learn how to:

  • Create an S2S VPN connection
  • Update the connection property: pre-shared key, BGP, IPsec/IKE policy
  • Add more VPN connections
  • Delete a VPN connection

The following diagram shows the topology for this tutorial:

Working with Azure Cloud Shell and Azure PowerShell

This article uses PowerShell cmdlets. To run the cmdlets, you can use Azure Cloud Shell. The Azure Cloud Shell is a free interactive shell that you can use to run the steps in this article. It has common Azure tools preinstalled and configured to use with your account.

Key

To open the Cloud Shell, just select Try it from the upper right corner of a code block. You can also launch Cloud Shell in a separate browser tab by going to https://shell.azure.com/powershell. Select Copy to copy the blocks of code, paste it into the Cloud Shell, and press enter to run it.

Requirements

Complete the first tutorial: Create VPN gateway with Azure PowerShell to create the following resources:

  1. Resource group (TestRG1), virtual network (VNet1), and the GatewaySubnet
  2. VPN gateway (VNet1GW)

The virtual network parameter values are listed below. Note the additional values for the local network gateway which represent your on-premises network. Change the values below based on your environment and network setup, then copy and paste to set the variables for this tutorial. If your Cloud Shell session times out, or you need to use a different PowerShell window, copy and paste the variables to your new session and continue the tutorial.

Note

If you are using this to make a connection, be sure to change the values to match your on-premises network. If you are just running these steps as a tutorial, you don't need to make changes, but the connection will not work.

The workflow to create an S2S VPN connection is straightforward:

  1. Create a local network gateway to represent your on-premises network
  2. Create a connection between your Azure VPN gateway and the local network gateway

Create a local network gateway

A local network gateway represents your on-premises network. You can specify the properties of your on-premises network in the local network gateway, including:

  • Public IP address of your VPN device
  • On-premises address space
  • (Optional) BGP attributes (BGP peer IP address and AS number)

Create a local network gateway with the New-AzLocalNetworkGateway command.

Create a S2S VPN connection

Next, create a Site-to-Site VPN connection between your virtual network gateway and your VPN device with the New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection. Notice that the '-ConnectionType' for Site-to-Site VPN is IPsec.

Add the optional '-EnableBGP $True' property to enable BGP for the connection if you are using BGP. It is disabled by default. Parameter '-ConnectionProtocol' is optional with IKEv2 as default. You can create the connection with IKEv1 protocols by specifying -ConnectionProtocol IKEv1.

Update the VPN connection pre-shared key, BGP, and IPsec/IKE policy

View and update your pre-shared key

Azure S2S VPN connection uses a pre-shared key (secret) to authenticate between your on-premises VPN device and the Azure VPN gateway. You can view and update the pre-shared key for a connection with Get-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnectionSharedKey and Set-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnectionSharedKey.

Important

The pre-shared key is a string of printable ASCII characters no longer than 128 in length.

This command shows the pre-shared key for the connection:

The output will be '[email protected]!b2C3' following the example above. Use the command below to change the pre-shared key value to '[email protected]!_b2=C3':

Enable BGP on VPN connection

Azure VPN gateway supports BGP dynamic routing protocol. You can enable BGP on each individual connection, depending on whether you are using BGP in your on-premises networks and devices. Specify the following BGP properties before enabling BGP on the connection:

  • Azure VPN ASN (Autonomous System Number)
  • On-premises local network gateway ASN
  • On-premises local network gateway BGP peer IP address

If you have not configured the BGP properties, the following commands add these properties to your VPN gateway and local network gateway: Set-AzVirtualNetworkGateway and Set-AzLocalNetworkGateway.

Use the following example to configure BGP properties:

Enable BGP with Set-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection.

You can disable BGP by changing the '-EnableBGP' property value to $False. Refer to BGP on Azure VPN gateways for more detailed explanations of BGP on Azure VPN gateways.

Apply a custom IPsec/IKE policy on the connection

You can apply an optional IPsec/IKE policy to specify the exact combination of IPsec/IKE cryptographic algorithms and key strengths on the connection, instead of using the default proposals. The following sample script creates a different IPsec/IKE policy with the following algorithms and parameters:

  • IKEv2: AES256, SHA256, DHGroup14
  • IPsec: AES128, SHA1, PFS14, SA Lifetime 14,400 seconds & 102,400,000 KB

Refer to IPsec/IKE policy for S2S or VNet-to-VNet connections for a complete list of algorithms and instructions.

Add another S2S VPN connection

Add an additional S2S VPN connection to the same VPN gateway, create another local network gateway, and create a new connection between the new local network gateway and the VPN gateway. Use the following examples, making sure to modify the variables to reflect your own network configuration.

There are now two S2S VPN connections to your Azure VPN gateway.

Delete a S2S VPN connection

Cisco Pre-shared-key

Delete a S2S VPN connection with Remove-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection.

Delete the local network gateway if you no longer need it. You cannot delete a local network gateway if there are other connections associated with it.

Clean up resources

If this configuration is part of a prototype, test, or proof-of-concept deployment, you can use the Remove-AzResourceGroup command to remove the resource group, the VPN gateway, and all related resources.

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Next steps

In this tutorial, you learned about creating and managing S2S VPN connections such as how to:

Cisco Vpn Pre Shared Key Generator

  • Create an S2S VPN connection
  • Update the connection property: pre-shared key, BGP, IPsec/IKE policy
  • Add more VPN connections
  • Delete a VPN connection

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Advance to the following tutorials to learn about S2S, VNet-to-VNet, and P2S connections.